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World's Fair Diary - TV Guide

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This is very interesting.  Thank you for sharing.  

By the end of July of 1964 even TV Guide was showing skepticism about the Fair:  "...architecture is occasionally gimcracky [a cheap or showy object of no use] instead of original....";  "...difficult to find your way around...."; "...vast clutter of pavilions...."; "...few impressive vistas....".  Not exactly rave reviews that would inspire crowds to storm the gates.  The best part of Mr. Newman's experience was learning what people did to kill time while waiting in long lines, spotting "beautiful women" and cracking puns.  Based on all of this, why even bother to go to the place?

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Script by..... Never saw that before, for a review/documentary.

Widely acclaimed Spanish Pavillion? Did I miss something? I might be youthful and born after the fair, I don't recall anything really exciting about it in anything I've read or seen in pictures.

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56 minutes ago, icedstitch said:

Script by..... Never saw that before, for a review/documentary.

Widely acclaimed Spanish Pavillion? Did I miss something? I might be youthful and born after the fair, I don't recall anything really exciting about it in anything I've read or seen in pictures.

The Spanish Pavilion received wide critical acclaim from architects and designers for its pre-cast concrete walls, its content and its restaurants.  

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33 minutes ago, expoboy said:

The Spanish Pavilion received wide critical acclaim from architects and designers for its pre-cast concrete walls, its content and its restaurants.  

And don't forget the artists they had on display like Picasso.  (I believe they had 3 works of his on display)

 

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I guess I'm different, I've gotten really excited about the States, US, boy scout, German and industry pavilions, underground home and others.  I looked over the Spanish one just now after you mentioned that, doesn't yell NYWF64.

d-:

Love this listing.

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For what it's worth, my impression of Newman was that he was a glass-half-empty type and never encountered a situation he couldn't say something bad about. "Script by Newman" should be considered a warning as much as simply informative. 

The upper left of the page refers to the last "Hazel" rerun of the season, and says it will be replaced by a New Christy Minstrels musical series. We know the New Christy Minstrels did some video taping at the fair. I wonder if those sessions were going to be used in this series?

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Critics of that time gave credence to artistic creativity, architectural noteworthiness.... in other words class system at it's New York fineness.  The flip side is that they were downright snooty about anything the common man stood in long lines to see. (it couldn't be worthy of anything at all if the riff raff want to see it, implying that the riff raff has no concept of the "finer things").

Watch the panelists on What's My Line or To Tell the Truth 60's game shows- classic upper crust.

Thank goodness that hoity toidiness has broken down a great deal in the decades since.

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I liked Orson Bean, Peggy Cass, Tom Poston and Kitty Carlisle.  Orson Bean, the only one of the four still living, is a Tony Award winning stage actor and has won Emmy nominations for his wide variety of television work and is a successful author. Tom Poston won three Emmy awards as George, the handyman at the Inn  on tv's Newhart and had a prolific tv and movie career.   Peggy Cass, a talented stage actress, was hilarious as Agnes Gooch in Auntie Mame on Broadway and in the film.  She won a Tony and then a Best Supporting Actress nomination for each portrayal.   Kitty Carlisle was a true patron of the arts.  Governor Nelson Rockefeller appointed her to the newly formed NYS Council of the Arts in the 1960s and she was chair of that council from 1976-1986.  She battled for historic preservation across the NYS and, to this day, it is the only state arts council that provides funding to artistic endeavors and assists with historic preservation thanks to her leadership.  She was so active in these endeavors that the Egg Theatre on the Rockefeller Mall in Albany has been named in her honor.  President George H. W. Bush awarded her the National Medal of the Arts in 1991.

All were remarkable contributors to American culture life.

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