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Bill Cotter

Which cover do you like best?

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My publisher is still working on some cover possibilities for my new book on the 1939-40 New York World's Fair. They want something that will readily stand out from the first book, as that one is still on sale. Which image do you prefer - version C, D, or E? The cover of the first book is included for comparison (no voting for that one!)

cover-c.jpg

cover-d.jpg

cover-e.jpg

cover-old.jpg

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If I walked into a bookstore and were buying a book about the 1939-1940 World's Fair, it would have to include the Trylon and Perisphere on the cover.  Those were the symbols of that fair.  The "D" cover suggests a circus, and the "E" cover an amusement park.  The "C" cover photo is beautiful in its own right, just as a photo.  I would go with the "C" cover.  

Just my 2 cents.

 

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4 hours ago, sunguar said:

If I walked into a bookstore and were buying a book about the 1939-1940 World's Fair, it would have to include the Trylon and Perisphere on the cover.  Those were the symbols of that fair.  The "D" cover suggests a circus, and the "E" cover an amusement park.  The "C" cover photo is beautiful in its own right, just as a photo.  I would go with the "C" cover.  

Just my 2 cents.

 

Thanks!

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I agree with Ray. "C" is an iconic choice. Both of the competitor images are overly busy, with really junky elements and little indication of what the pics represent.

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I get it.  I see why C is the iconic cover.  Every 1939 NYWf book I own, and there are a number of them, uses the theme center on the cover.  It's expected.

But there is something absolutely wonderful about E.  Those two are members of the greatest generation.  Look at the sheer enjoyment on their faces as the Parachute Ride comes to an end.  Their faces radiate everything I have ever read or heard the Fair was all about--joy, hope, enthusiasm, wonder.  Your book has many excellent theme center photographs.  Photo E captures something more important.  Those two are a part of the 45 million who loved that Fair, never forgot it and told stories for the rest of their lives.  The Fair was all about them.

I hope you'll consider E.

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Cover "C" is my choice!

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1 hour ago, Jim said:

I get it.  I see why C is the iconic cover.  Every 1939 NYWf book I own, and there are a number of them, uses the theme center on the cover.  It's expected.

But there is something absolutely wonderful about E.  Those two are members of the greatest generation.  Look at the sheer enjoyment on their faces as the Parachute Ride comes to an end.  Their faces radiate everything I have ever read or heard the Fair was all about--joy, hope, enthusiasm, wonder.  Your book has many excellent theme center photographs.  Photo E captures something more important.  Those two are a part of the 45 million who loved that Fair, never forgot it and told stories for the rest of their lives.  The Fair was all about them.

I hope you'll consider E.

That happens to be one of my favorite NYWF39 images!!! I have it rotating as one of my wallpapers.

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My mom rode the parachute ride at the fair so I would choose E. Besides the ride is still in existence at Coney Island ,one of the few remnants left from the 30 fair. 

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I love E also (but I know what it is) - as I was told more than once, covers must be identifiable (no liner covers w/o smoke stacks!). From the options given, C. I love E, but will it do the business? The other two also have my eye wandering - not concise statements. Not liking D.

C shows Theme, lighting, sculpture, crowds, fashion, architecture (a bit) and the whole atmosphere as well as the mist from the central lagoon. The others are too specific in subject.

C appears to have the most acceptable composition for the consumer as well. Loving E, but see the need for C.

Say, can you accept other images at this late date? ;)

E

 

 

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The Theme Center may be a cliche, but line up all three across the room and which one gets your attention? C it must be, unless Eric has something up his sleeve.

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For many of us, the Trylon and Perisphere are recognizable images.  We all know something about the great expositions and their buildings and New York's 1939 theme center is at the top of the list, I suspect. In 1992, I used a similar theme center photograph for my masters thesis at SUNY Binghamton and it earned a university thesis of the year award. But if the theme center photo is really cliche, that's not a selling point. If I had the photograph E, I would have use it on the cover instead. 

I wonder what someone seeking to learn about such a fair, someone who is not familiar with the theme center, would find appealing in such a book.  Fairs are all about people and their experiences and some of the hundreds of amateur of slides and photos of people enjoying a fair that we have enjoyed on this site bring the event back to life.  We've seen some great people photos from almost every fair and they leave us wondering what was happening, what they were thinking or doing or what attraction they had just enjoyed.  

We're world's fair enthusiasts and are drawn to the images of buildings, to maps, to landscaping, to the structures that made fairs recognizable.  We often linger over a photo of a fire hydrant, waste basket or the placement of a lighting fixture.  When I saw photo E, I saw the NYWF in a whole new way.  I saw the joy it brought to a Depression weary nation.  It reminded me why NYC held a Fair in the first place.  And that photo just may attract readers unfamiliar with the NYWF because it is curious, joyful and inviting.   Fairs are far more than their iconic structures.  They live on in the memories of those people who enjoyed them.  Thanks to Bill sharing that remarkably human and endearing photograph, I will never look at the NYWF in the same way.

I'll shut up now.

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5 hours ago, waynebretl said:

The Theme Center may be a cliche, but line up all three across the room and which one gets your attention? C it must be, unless Eric has something up his sleeve.

Eric does! Submitted to Bill :)

Maybe he will show it?

23 minutes ago, Jim said:

For many of us, the Trylon and Perisphere are recognizable images.  We all know something about the great expositions and their buildings and New York's 1939 theme center is at the top of the list, I suspect. In 1992, I used a similar theme center photograph for my masters thesis at SUNY Binghamton and it earned a university thesis of the year award. But if the theme center photo is really cliche, that's not a selling point. If I had the photograph E, I would have use it on the cover instead. 

I wonder what someone seeking to learn about such a fair, someone who is not familiar with the theme center, would find appealing in such a book.  Fairs are all about people and their experiences and some of the hundreds of amateur of slides and photos of people enjoying a fair that we have enjoyed on this site bring the event back to life.  We've seen some great people photos from almost every fair and they leave us wondering what was happening, what they were thinking or doing or what attraction they had just enjoyed.  

We're world's fair enthusiasts and are drawn to the images of buildings, to maps, to landscaping, to the structures that made fairs recognizable.  We often linger over a photo of a fire hydrant, waste basket or the placement of a lighting fixture.  When I saw photo E, I saw the NYWF in a whole new way.  I saw the joy it brought to a Depression weary nation.  It reminded me why NYC held a Fair in the first place.  And that photo just may attract readers unfamiliar with the NYWF because it is curious, joyful and inviting.   Fairs are far more than their iconic structures.  They live on in the memories of those people who enjoyed them.  Thanks to Bill sharing that remarkably human and endearing photograph, I will never look at the NYWF in the same way.

I'll shut up now.

I won't disagree!

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