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Bill Cotter

Night at Expo '67

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I enjoyed Expo at night, when the sun went down and many of the guests went home.

canada-night-2.jpg

16 minutes ago, expoboy said:

Exceptional night view.

I have a bunch more to work through!

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Expo absolutely glittered at night.  My first view was from a hilltop park in Westmount on Expo's opening night.  I'll remember it for as long as I can remember anything.

Thank you for these photos, Bill.  My god, they are impressive.

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The United Nations pavilion was impressive on its perch along the edge of Ile Notre Dame.  And those lighting fixtures provided such warm and inviting illumination.

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18 hours ago, Jim said:

Bill, how did you come by these slides?  I mean, how do you find such treasures?

I found them on eBay and decided I really didn't need to buy groceries for a few weeks...

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I would gladly fast in order to find such remarkable photographs.  Thank you SO much for sharing these with us.  

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Bill, I cannot adequately explain how much these photographs enliven my day.  My health issues continue to decline and when I finally do sit down at the laptop and discover photos, and outstanding ones at that, of Expo, it makes me so happy.  Whoever took these shots knew what he or she was doing.  They are not oddly taken snap shots or even rather sterile postal card scenes.  These photos are thought provoking and artistic.  They are actually quite elegant.   Most importantly, they capture some of the heart, spirit and joy of Expo, an event none of us is likely to see replicated.  To put this another way, these excellent photographs take me back to my youth and the best trip of my life.

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Bill, I have to second Jim's comments.

Expo 67 was my "other" world's fair, and I was lucky enough to be able to spend a solid week there.  My parents had a close friend who lived in Montreal and I stayed out there in Westmont, happy to be able to take 2 Metro lines back-and-forth each day!

Looking at photos of both fairs, expo definitely was far more elegant, photogenic and international than the New York fair.  But New York had the dark rides!!!

Now, if I could only get my hands on one of those reflective lighting fixtures...

 

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George, a whole week at Expo!  How fortunate. I'll bet you have some wonderful memories.  I also stayed in Westmount with my school group and we took the green Metro line right to the Central Station and transferred to the Expo Express from there.  I had three days at Expo.  I'd give just about anything to have one more hour.

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NYWF definitely embodied mid-century futurism like nothing else, but Expo looks much more like the future that actually happened.  If these pictures were presented without context, I'd assume they were pictures of some EPCOT Center-inspired world's fair or theme park in the 1980s.

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Expo 67 had a powerful influence from its design board which created everything from the concept of the island setting to the Mini Rail to the street lighting.  Many Expo pavilions won architectural praise from around the globe including the Federal Republic of Germany pavilion, the Netherlands pavilion (with 33 miles of aluminum tubing forming the exterior and the building suspended inside), Man the Explorer and Man the Producer, the USA pavilion, Man and the Community and Habitat 67.  The pavilions of Ontario, Quebec and Canada also won high praise. Frei Otto's tent-like design for the German pavilion was recreated for the 1972 Munich Olympic Stadium and Moshe Safdie began his architectural career with Habitat and has been creatively at work for fifty years.

A strong design board has a great deal to do with the success of great expositions, I suspect.  Consider Chicago in 1893, New York in 1939 and Montreal in 1967.  All were remarkably inspired and remain memorable.

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What was nice about Expo 67 is that the design board wasn't so strict that the pavilions lost much of their own identity, such as at Expo 86. That one strongly encouraged modular blocks of buildings that could be easily removed and repurposed.

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