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xl5er

TV Remote Control 1956

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Thanks!

Some may not know, Alliance was a long time well-known maker of antenna rotators. 

This is the first I've seen of this wired remote, and I had to think for a few minutes how they could sell something that would work with a range of TVs instead of a certain model only. It's too bad you can't read the instructions even in the enlarged version, but I think it worked this way:

I believe the key she is turning operated a toggle bolt mechanism to clamp the unit to the face of the TV through the hole behind the original channel knob. I also think the box on the TV contained a DC motor and gears that had deliberate backlash (free play) so that the tuner's detent for each channel could operate without the exact rotation angle being forced by the motor. The remote box would contain the batteries and push-button switches for forward and reverse. It would be up to the user to hold down the button until the tuner went "clunk" into the next detent, and quickly release before the tuner was driven out of the detent. 

Operation with this device would be iffy for TV models that didn't have an individual preset fine tuning adjustment for each channel.

 

Many households already had a mobile wireless remote in the form of a kid who would be told to get up and change the channel.

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1 hour ago, George J Fogel said:

I see that the screen was round with the top and bottom masked off; could this have been an early color TV?

You've got the shape right, but this one was black and white. By the way, the round tube black and white sets were already out of style in 1956. Maybe some of my fellow collectors can identify this model's year. 

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5 hours ago, Bill Cotter said:

All she needs next is one of the gadgets that promised to magnify your screen to become a big-screen set.

To say nothing of the screen that promised to change your black-and white tv into color. LOL

6 hours ago, waynebretl said:

Many households already had a mobile wireless remote in the form of a kid who would be told to get up and change the channel.

My price was a bowl of popcorn. :)

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Quoting a fellow collector:

"1949 RCA Model No. 9-TC-272 B/W set with the 16AP4 CRT. Outstanding performer too, 4 or 5 IF stages, DC coupled video."

Here's one of the remotes at the Early Television Museum, so I guess I did see one, but I didn't remember; and also a "color converter" plastic sheet.

I-T wired remote.jpg

Color By Eastmon.jpg

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I wish I still had one of those heavy remote control devices that earned those contraptions the nickname "Clicker."   I can still envision our Zenith Space Commander 600.  

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Looks like cabinet had two doors that swung closed to hide unsightly screen. Mounting the motor box prevents that door from closing and leaves a tangled wire trailing to the remote. I’ll bet a lot of fuming wives folded their arms and glowered at that contraption as though it were a leg lamp. 

I can’t improve resolution to allow manual to be read. 

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I knew that the first B/W TV screens were also round, but I thought they had died out by the mid-50's...   We had a Dumont but the screen was already squared off.

Now, I do remember those plastic sheets to turn B/W into COLORED TV!  

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They must have studied P.T. Barnum 101 "There's a sucker born every minute".

 

In that photo of the plastic sheet it says 'Color by Eastmon."

Making suckers think 'Eastmon- that must be those Kodak people up in Rochester; they have the BEST color!'

"It's the Jamican branch of Kodak, mon!"

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The great-granddaddy of malicious internet sites.

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A correction from another collector:

"...a 1951 9-T-77. The screen is 19" on the 9-T-77 and the 9TC272 did not have the doors depicted. The 9-T-77 did."

Also worth noting: the cabinet door could no longer be closed after installing this device = zero WAF (Wife Acceptance Factor).

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Man's response- silently goes out to the garage to get a screwdriver to take off the cabinet doors. :)

 

Doors just get in the way of watching the Yankees vs the Dodgers in the '56 World Series anyway.

As Archie Bunker might have said "if the Good Lord had intended doors to be on da cabinet, he woulda put doors on the Ark before he gave it to Moses dere in da desert.  See Moses needed to watch da tv in da Ark constantly to keep an eye on Pharoah sneekin' up on 'em from beyond.  No doors.  Pharoah drowns.  Simple as dat."

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