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Bill Cotter

It's time once again to play "Name That Tune!"

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I'm still looking for the names of some of the songs played as background music at the Fair. Got a good ear? Take a listen and see if you can name any of the unidentified ones.
 
 
Thanks to Wayne Bretl for sending me a few of these, making me realize how many we still need to name.

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Unless you are a martial music musicologist, I'd suggest working on Tape 2 first (try a few on Tape 1 and you'll see why I say that). So don't get discouraged by Tape 1. Tape 2 is all easy listening instrumentals from the 50s or 60s or thereabouts. Some of the still unidentified ones I recognize, but have no idea of the title. Plus there are a number I don't recognize, but if you grew up hearing these on the easy listening station, you very well may.

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Bill, I just listened to the un-named tracks on your tapes, and I'm on the case. About three of the un-named tracks that I identified suddenly became named when I returned to your post. Hmm.

Anyway, there are a bunch of marches that I think are in my music library, which I will search out soon.

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8 hours ago, RalphQuinn said:

... About three of the un-named tracks that I identified suddenly became named when I returned to your post. Hmm. ...

I had the same thing happen when I went to look at the list to verify the addition of some I identified.

Folks, be sure to refresh the page / clear your cache or whatever is required to do a complete reload.

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I have been busily updating it as I found more names. There sure are a lot of familiar sounding marches - but after a while listening to them they start sounding alike!

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Bill, here are three items (all Sousa):

Tape 1, Hour 3, Track 8: Hands Across the Sea

Tape 1, Hour 3, Track 9: The Gladiator

Tape 1, Hour 4, Track 10: High School Cadets

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Bill, I checked 52 of your marches against 29 of mine that you did not have listed. A quick check didn't turn up anything, but I ran across four marches that I am painfully familiar with but can't recall their names. Perhaps your other sleuths might try their luck with these familiar tunes:  Tape 1-Hour 3 Tracks 11, 13 and 14; Tape 1 Hour 4 Track 3.  

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Bill, I finally listened to the entire march in Tape 1 Hour 3 Track 14. The second melody is quite famous, with its "caissons go rolling along." It's Sousa's "U.S. Field Artillery."

Just a note about Hour 4 Track 3. The second melody, probably the most familiar, was used as a theme by a pair of entertainers on early radio station KDKA (Westinghouse, Pittsburgh, I believe). The words went "We're the joy boys of radio, hello hello hell-oh hell-oh!"

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I downloaded a couple of music ID apps to my phone, but they managed to come up with only one title on the easy-listening tape:

2-1-track19.mp3 - The Bluebells of Scotland (identified using phone app Soundhound) (composer: Leroy Anderson, Orchestra: unidentified) 

Surprisingly, a couple of march IDs popped right up.  Will have to try more after lunch:

1-3-track5.mp3 The Conqueror (ID via Soundhound)

1-4-track3.mp3 Billboard March - John Klor (ID via Soundhound)
 

 

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1-1-track2.mp3 The United States Army Band March

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Randy, "Bali Hai" does not appear to be the song itself, but perhaps some of the scene music that followed the song? The only statement of the familiar tune is at the end of Bill's recording, but one can also discern similarities in the falling notes that run through most of the recording. I haven't seen the movie in decades, so I'm just supposing.

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Sorry, but it's definitely not Bali Hai or any variation on it - only the first three notes are similar. This one drives me crazy because I have heard it but don't know the name.

Edit: I think most versions were played at a speedier tempo, giving it a latin/tango sound.

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Finally! Finally! This has been driving me crazy all this time. Today in the car I was playing some 30's music from a memory stick and Guy Lombardo's orchestra popped up this one! It is the second part, in a major key, of "Orchids in the Moonlight." It is a tango written for the film "Flying Down To Rio" (1933)  by Gus Kahn / Edward Eliscu / Vincent Youmans. I don't know about you, but when I heard the first part, it did not lead me to recall the second part at all, but my memory of it being played faster was correct.

First recording issued by Rudy Vallee, 

 

later done by many others, including The Platters in 1960

 

 

Bill: it's 2-3-track20.mp3 "Orchids in the Moonlight"

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I spent spare time going through dozens of easy listening albums on YouTube, and never found it, then it turned out I had it all along. 

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Just bumping this topic in case anyone who has recently joined the site wants to try their hand at identifying some of the remaining songs.

http://www.worldsfairphotos.com/nywf64/index-audio-video.htm

 

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Wayne,

Thanks very much for posting this compilation.  I have been puzzling over a catchy melody that seemed to play continuously at the admission booths to the Fair, but I had never heard it on any of the numerous NYWF videos that I have watched, and haven't heard it since then, except playing in the back of my mind. 

I found it on Tape 1, Hour 2, Track 23:  "Fair is Fair".  Somehow, this version isn't quite the same as what I remembered, as this is just a men's chorus, and I thought I recalled female voices as well, but I could be mistaken.  After 54 years, the details got a bit fuzzy. 

A Google search isn't much help as to the composer and original source.  It sounds like it might have come from some now-forgotten musical film or Broadway show.  The title has been co-opted by Sesame Street as well as some punk rockers. 

Do you have any idea what the original source or composer was?  One source ascribes it to Richard Rodgers of Rodgers and Hammerstein, but I can't find any mention of it in his opus list. 

Dave

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Yes, the commission for Fair is Fair went to Richard Rogers.

Recordings and sheet music of Fair is Fair are frequently for sale on eBay.

It's not in the same regard as one of the many R & M Broadway show tunes.  Perhaps Hammerstein not being there to contribute left it hollow.

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Here's some former discussion of "Fair is Fair"

 

 

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