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bornopeningday64

more pics of painting of crown

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Wow that looks great!

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Looks awesome. Can't help but make you imagine how cool it would be if someone donated a new tile roof... and refurbished the towers... and, while we're at it, replaced the terrazzo floor map!

Yeah, I know it could never happen for myriad reasons, but it is nice to imagine it.

BTW, I have a question about the original roof tiles. How exactly were they attached to the cables and each other? How were they able to achieve a watertight seal which would withstand expansion/contraction from heating/cooling cycles, wind flexing, etc.? (Or were they watertight)?

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see this post:

http://www.worldsfaircommunity.org/topic/8923-spruce-it-up-with-paint-and-haul-out-that-trash/?do=findComment&comment=98738

40,000 feet of Interchem Presstite tape used to seal joints between Kalwall roof panels of New York State Pavilion (NYSP)

Edit: I notice the pdf link is dead - sending Bill Cotter an email to ask if it can be resurrected.

 

Edited by waynebretl
corrected link to post

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Has anyone been able to estimate the cost of the tiles and engineering to recreate that new tile roof?

Edited by icedstitch

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Thanks, Wayne. After a Google search on "Interchem Presstite", I found this info about the roof panels and the elastic tape here in Christian Kellberg's "New York State Pavillion" book.

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Forgive my ignorance, but who is doing this excellent painting?  Is it the parks department?  How can they reach such a high area?  Is there a scaffold or something?  Oh, and by the way, it looks absolutely awesome!

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I passed by NYS pavilion this past Friday on way to Met game and the crown is about 3/4 the way around painted. Its striking as you pass by it on Grand Central Parkway. When will the towers be painted!!

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We were told that the towers have to undergo a multimillion dollar repair job first- primarily to the interior stairs.  Don't know what kind of timeline that project is on.  But the money is in place for it.

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Has anyone been able to estimate the cost of the tiles and engineering to recreate that new tile roof?

I guess if we knew what the original cost was in 1963, we could calculate the 2015 cost.  I was wondering the same thing.  But the engineering should be designed to ensure the tiles would not fall.  Probably very difficult if you think about the UV from the sun, and the freeze-thaw cycles.  Still, maybe someone could design a new multi-colored solution, something like a solid "umbrella" that would have a similar effect to the original?  Maybe like slices of pizza, if that makes sense?

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hi folks, a couple more pics of finished painting of crown. was at park on Friday and snapped a bunch of pics. Park was being treated to a US Open cleaning. Looked great!!

049.JPG

054.JPG

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We were told that the towers have to undergo a multimillion dollar repair job first- primarily to the interior stairs.  Don't know what kind of timeline that project is on.  But the money is in place for it.

Wait....what?!? There is money for  some restoration associated with the towers? When did that happen?

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Can't help but reflect on how all of this beautiful painting is the result of our own Johnny's enthusiasm and impetus. New York residents owe you a debt of gratitude, Johnny. Man oh man, doesn't it look beautiful???

And what a perfect training ground for the bridge painters union! I wonder how they painted in between those massive, pointy steel plates?

Have you ever pondered how many rivets there must be in that crown? I once tried counting them in just one crown section and it was mind boggling.

 

Edited by Doug Seed

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It really is an astounding transformation.  That first photograph of the pavilion, against the cloud swept sky, is truly impressive.

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The color seems all wrong.  The original crown paint was bright yellow, while the new paint is sort of a muddied gold.

Can someone please post of shot of the original pavilion for comparison?

 

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Bill,

In your first 2 photos, the color doesn't seem quite right either.  I always though the color was a very bright yellow, closer to what we see in your third picture.  

When you google photos of the pavilion, they all seem to come up with quite a vibrant yellow, sort of like the color of a taxicab.

I can remember the original paint as being quite vibrant and festive, not a muted tone like we see now.  

How did they ever choose this shade of paint; did they not research old photos, or did they just get a good deal on some compatible color?

Irv

 

 

 

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As I get older I have noticed a difficulty in discerning shades of color.  I have difficulty with dark blue and purple especially with LED lighting.  In the case of these photographs, the third shot sure looks similar to the new paint to me.  The first two vintage shots seem to be a lighter yellow.  But I don't care.  The pavilion is seeing the first loving care since October of 1965 when the lights went out. Even the Palace of Fine Arts does not look exactly as it did in 1915 nor does the Space Needle or the Biosphere in Montreal. The fresh paint on the Pavilion is a start and it will make it much more difficult for the City of NY or any other entity to continue to neglect it or even think of demolition. 

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Photos are not color swatches.  Photos attempt, with dyes or inks, to reproduce not only the color of a surface but all the variations due to light and shade, illumination by direct sun or blue sky, etc. etc. Look at the third photo from Bill, the interior one with the band. The yellow at the left is very saturated, but at the far right is desaturated and a little greener. So, there is not one "correct" color to refer to, even in the same photograph.

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