Jump to content
Bill Cotter

Some re-used pavilions in 1980

Recommended Posts

It always seems strange to see old friends wearing new outfits, at least when you're talking about world's fairs.

1980-floralies-sign.jpg

Sign for Floralies 1980, the big exhibit for Man and His World that year

1980-peru.jpg

Formerly Austria

1980-mexico.jpg

Formerly Scandinavia

1980-india.jpg

Formerly Japan

1980-egypt.jpg

Formerly Iran

1980-romania.jpg

Formerly New York State

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wonderful shots! The Iran pavilion really is out-of-place as an Egyptian exhibit simply because the mosaics on the front represented rolled Persian carpets. Iran is Persian and Egypt is Arab. It's a difference I suppose only an Expo enthusiast would notice. And the NYS pavilion looks strange to me just because I saw it several times as the NYS pavilion. But that's ok. These are wonderful pieces of history captured on film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if those are flag poles along the top of the Egypt/Iran pavilion... and if so, why no flags?

That is some nice looking tile work, but you're right, Jim, it looks out of place for Egypt. Nice building.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those things do not appear in 1967 era images of the Iran pavilion--either in photographs or in post card images. There are certainly no flags flying. I have no idea what they might be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The tile work is different on the Egypt pavilion from when it was Iran. I haven't found any post 67 photos yet that show those poles other than the one above.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neither have I but I don't see differences in the mosaics either. Are you saying you have photographic evidence that the mosaics were changed so that this could become an Egyptian exhibit?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure do! Here it is in 3D as a matter of fact. I'm just running out but will post a close-up later.

3d-iran.jpg

And in 1970 they obliterated the 1967 tiles.

1970-usa-iran.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the original tiles were removed early on during Man and His World because they were not "winter proof' and were breaking in several places. They did not apply new tiles but simply painted new pattern over the original column

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info, Roger. I do have some photos showing missing tiles, and I'm sure it was easier/cheaper to just paint the columns. I guess that explains the 1970 paint job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yet that 1980 photo appears to have the original blue and white mosaics while that later shot has the columns a pea green color. I am confused. What was their color in 1980? And clearly there were no flagpoles or much of anything else visible along the roof lines in any shot other than the one when the building was labeled as an Egypt exhibit..

I have very vivid memories of the Iran pavilion. It really was very impressive. Those columns were beautiful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jim, in 1967 the Iran pavilion featured tiles that I would describe as showing flowers and birds. In 1980 the columns had a number of geometric patterns on the. The one with the solid columns is 1970.

So:

1967 - blue tiles with floral/bird design

1969 - original pattern still there but starting to fall apart as seen in "splotches" on this shot

1969-iran.jpg

Here's a close-up from 1969:

1969-iran-2.jpg

1970 - tiles removed, columns a solid color

1980 - geometric pattern as Egypt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The round blue and yellow tent from the first picture is from the 1976 Olympics...it was one of many that surrounded the Olympic Stadium.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Jim, @Bill Cotter , @Roger Hi Guys,

I am really amazed about all your information you guys have about Iran Pavilion in Montreal, 1967 Expo. I am an Iranian architect, residing in Montreal currently and doing some research about that pavilion. Can I count on your knowledge and information please? I really appreciate it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, alireza795 said:

@Jim, @Bill Cotter , @Roger Hi Guys,

I am really amazed about all your information you guys have about Iran Pavilion in Montreal, 1967 Expo. I am an Iranian architect, residing in Montreal currently and doing some research about that pavilion. Can I count on your knowledge and information please? I really appreciate it. 

Sure, glad to help if I can.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 01/08/2017 at 4:37 AM, Bill Cotter said:

Sure, glad to help if I can.

Hi Alireza,

This is Hamed from Iran.

I was researching on the tile working in Pahlavi Era. It is nice I can see  photos from the tiles of Iran 1967 pavilion.

Have you get new information?

You can send me E-Mail: HDDaryai@Yahoo.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How does one store a building.

Were these dismantled like an IKEA dresser drawer, and stored?

---OR---

Were the architectural plans bought and they were rebuilt?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be really surprised if anything was rebuilt from scratch for use by a different organization. To my mind, the only incentive to rebuild from scratch would be for the original organization to exhibit elsewhere.

So, I would ask this question about the repeat exhibitors, like Thailand and Belgium. Belgium was rebuilt from scratch, and not identical from fair to fair. We have various other examples of pavilions that were bought, dismantled, and reassembled by new owners.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe Belgium for the 1964 Fair re-used some of the molds used to create the village at Chicago 1933. It was a very close copy overall.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Bill Cotter said:

I believe Belgium for the 1964 Fair re-used some of the molds used to create the village at Chicago 1933. It was a very close copy overall.

Aha. Interesting, and makes sense.

That does seem like a long time to store the molds, though - makes me think of further questions:

Did they perhaps store them in the US with a contractor? Did they exhibit anywhere else in between? (Of course, there was an interruption for WWII.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No answers on any of that, Wayne. I have also read they were used for a Belgium Village at Expo 58 but I haven't found enough photos to establish matches between the buildings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NY Times article about the financial problems in 1964 and the history of the village

https://www.nytimes.com/1964/05/23/archives/belgian-village-at-fair-deserted-but-backer-hopes-to-raise-funds-to.html

"Alfonse DeRidjt, the archi‐tect, first designed the village in 1930, when it was shown in Antwerp. With a partner, L. Paid, he exhibited the village at the Chicago World's Fair in 1933‐34, and the Brussels World's Fair in 1958. The exhibit at both fairs drew 12 per cent of all visitors."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, that helps convince me I wasn't hallucinating about Expo 58! Sounds like Alfonse must have kept the molds in storage. I wonder if they are still in crates somewhere today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A NY Times article on May 23, 1964 documents the problems with an unfinished and unfunded Belgian Village at the Fair. The article states that an Alphonse DeRidjt and partner, L. Paid, "decided to bring the exhibit to Flushing Meadow."  It states that these two men designed the village and displayed it at Antwerp inn 1930 then in Chicago in 1933-34 and then in Brussels in 1958.  Then that news story gets a bit confusing because it states:  "Mr. Potie died during the summer of 1961and Mr. DeRidjt arrived in New York in February of 1962 in search of a partner."  Is Mr. Potie the same person as L. Paid?

A partner was found but funding was slow in coming and construction of the Flemish village (this is what Mr. De Ridjt called it) was delayed.

I'd bet the village was basically the same at each fair but how could it have been some sort of a set when the entire thing was built from scratch in NY?  The plans and design may have been identical, of course.  

I also remember hearing that when the 1965 Fair closed, the Belgian Village was imploded with explosives.

The best known re-used pavilion must be Thailand's 1964-65 NY pavilion which was dismantled, transported and enlarged for Expo 67 in Montreal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×