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A 1914 map of San Francisco showing the World's Fair that would be held there the following year. Fort Point on the far left is where the Golden Gate Bridge would be built twenty years later. Only the Palace of Fine Arts was retained when the Fair closed, the rest became the Marina neighborhood.

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I've only been to SF once and stayed in the Marina district and I recall believing that our hotel was very near the spot where the Tower of Jewels once stood.

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Almost everything west of the Palace of Fine Arts was returned to the military and became a sea of barracks during the two world wars. The "athletic field" become a military aircraft landing strip for a few decades, called "Crissy Field" (still the name today). It had a VERY short grass runway (scout planes only), but there is a story of at least one bomber during WWII making an emergency landing there, and later taking off while big crowds watched. I think they had to strip all the guns and armor off to make it light enough to fly it out of there.

Some of the southwest corners of the fairgrounds were bulldozed in the 1930's to make the long elevated approach ramp to the Golden Gate Bridge.

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Crissy Field today is a being returned to a more natural state as part of the Golden Gate Recreational Area. That beach is a favorite of dog walkers, and the view of the Golden Gate Bridge is fantastic.

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Crissy Field has a lot of kite flyers now too. It was packed with people when we were there last year during Fleet Week- they were there to watch the Blue Angels perform.

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Jim-- if that hotel was the Edward-- you were right. It was originally built in 1914 to house PPIE guests and was on Lombard Street, only one block from the fair's main entrance. You can occasionally glimpse it in period panorama shots. It finally closed in 2010 after 96 years.

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Yes, only the Palace of Fine Arts remains...but it gives us a splendid example of the amazing architecture that made up the 1915 Expo. Multiply the Palace of Fine Arts by about 100 and you'll start to get the idea.

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I once saw a panorama of the PPIE in the Exploratorium at the Palace of Fine Arts. It was many years ago and I cannot recall if it was a series of photographs combined to make the panorama or if it was a painting. In any event, it was huge and it gave the viewer a very good idea of how spectacular that fair must have been. I know the museum has relocated and I do not know what became of that panorama.

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