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Westinghouse Pavilion Short Added to The National Film Registry

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"The Middleton Family At The New York World's Fair" (1939), a short produced by Westinghouse for the 39/40 NYWF, has just been added to the Library of Congress National Film Registry.

The annual list of 25 films that will join the Registry spans from 1897-1999 and reflects important cultural, artistic and historic achievements in filmmaking.

The list includes the 1914 version of Uncle Toms Cabin, George Cukors 1950 Born Yesterday, Truman Capotes 1961 Breakfast At Tiffanys, Don Siegels 1971 Dirty Harry, Bob Clarks 1983 A Christmas Story, Richard Linklaters 1991 Slacker, Penny Marshalls 1992 A League Of Their Own, and the Wachowskis 1999 The Matrix.

Librarian of Congress James H. Billington said, These films are not selected as the best American films of all time, but rather as works of enduring importance to American culture. They reflect who we are as a people and as a nation. The National Film Registry now totals 600 films. All titles will be preserved either through the Librarys motion picture preservation program or through collaborative ventures with other archives, studios and independent filmmakers.

According to the Registry:

"The Middleton Family At The New York Worlds Fair" is a striking hour-long time capsule that documents that historic event within a moralistic narrative. Shot in Technicolor, the film follows a fictional Indiana family of five (mom, dad, son, daughter and grandma) as they venture from grandmas quaint house in Long Island to the fairs popular pavilions. The whole family enjoys the gleaming sights, especially the futuristic technologies located in the Westinghouse Pavilion (including something called television). While the entire family is affected by the visit, none are changed so much as daughter Babs (played by a young Marjorie Lord), who eventually sours on her foreign-born, anti-capitalistic boyfriend in favor of a hometown electrical engineer who works at the fair. Both charming and heavy-handed, The Middleton Family provides latter-day audiences with a vibrant documentary record of the fairs technological achievements and the heartland values of the age.

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I saw last week where some 40's movie is being released on Blu-Ray, and the article said they took it from the Library of Congress digital restoration because it's the best in the world. The original nitrade negative was gone, but the Library of Congress had a first generation negative that had been made from that original nitrate, and had commissioned a digital restoration from their first generation negative.

Hopefully they'll do the same thing with the Middleton film.

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"Jim Treadway, from back home. His folks said he's working at the Westinghouse Building" - Love it! This film deserves such attention.

How does Bud make Babs napkin float tho at the breakfast table?

Eric

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"Jim Treadway, from back home. His folks said he's working at the Westinghouse Building"

Yes, I always liked that part. My uncle was named Jim. :)

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