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An interesting shot of a Greyhound Escorter

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empty-escorter.jpg

September 1964

I guess in 1964 you could leave a sweater on the seat and not worry about it being there when you come back.

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Even after four months of use, the gold upholstery was looking good.

Probably it didn't get ENOUGH use and that's why they were dropped at the end of October. As I recall, the fare was *so expensive* that when you saw one going by with somebody in it, you just *knew* that they had to be "somebody". Yet, we've heard that actual VIPs were ferried from pavilion to pavilion in cars rather than Escorters. The highest falutin' VIPs probably wanted a little more privacy than an Escorter could provide, and they might have wanted a little more speed too.

These kind of 'taxis' were quite successful at earlier World's Fairs- we've seen photos of versions in San Diego, Chicago, San Francisco, New York ('39-40) and so on. Something was different this time around. Maybe after World War II peoples' tastes changed. Or maybe the fare was just too darned high.

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empty-escorter.jpg

September 1964

I guess in 1964 you could leave a sweater on the seat and not worry about it being there when you come back.

The sweater probably belonged to the white dress next to the escorter....WOW - wish we could see the rest her her!...lol

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Randy, what was the fare? Do you know? Also, how fast did those things go? That is a good close-up view but having said this, it really does not appear to be all that comfortable especially on a hot or wet day. It does not seem all that practical in its design.

Jim

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I believe the rate was $9 an hour. In 1964 economic terms, that ruled out 99% of visitors.

According to the Consumer Price Index, $9 an hour in July 1964 equates to $66 an hour in December 2012 (the most recent value in the table). Who today would pay $66 an hour to be ferried from pavilion to pavilion?

Most dads would say 'get yer butt up and walk, ya lazy bum!'

I remember, even as a 7 year old, when I asked 'can we go for a ride on one of those?', my mom just whispered, 'oh, we can't afford it'.

Somebody here DOES know the top speed.. or rather the 'constant speed'. There was a governor on the engine. It was very slow- no faster than somebody could walk anyway. In the opening day show with Fred McMurray, he rides in one that it's a line of Escorters going across the Ave. of U.N. South bridge, all at the same constant speed, so you can get an idea by watching that footage.

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it does not appear to be all that comfortable especially on a hot or wet day. It does not seem all that practical in its design.

Pretty much all previous World's Fairs had featured some kind of bus / tram in various guises, as well as a more personal taxi gradually evolving over the years from pedicab or even push-cart. These gradually evolved to become motorized and 'sculpted' by 1964. And that was pretty much the death knell for them. I don't remember seeing any such thing as personal taxis in 1967 or 1970 or thereafter... do you guys?

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I don't believe there was any such conveyance at Expo 67. I have seen many photos of these personal escorters from earlier fairs and it has struck me that they were used by the "elite" while the regular joes walked the grounds. Thanks for the information.

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At the San Diego International Exposition in 1915, one of the personal taxis numbered #11 is in this photo.

oakwith.jpg

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I wonder what the fare was at the Century 21 Expo in Seattle in 1962?

Century21Pedicab.jpg

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Interesting....apparently they made a re-appearance at Expo 2005 in Aichi, in the form of "electrically assisted" pedicabs:

expo4pedicabs.jpg

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Uh-oh. Expo 67 had them too. I never knew this.

Pedicab_1.jpg

pedicab_2.jpg

pedicab_3.jpg

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A pedicab ride in Seattle was 50 cents, Randy.

pedicab.jpg

But was it 50 cents an hour, 50 cents a mile, 50 cents a pound ... ?

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The sign also mentions 'Electricabs'. Do you have a picture of one of those Bill?

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Sure do - will post after some sleep!

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Here are a few views for you, Randy, of Electricabs at the 1962 Seattle fair. Basically they were Cushman carts.

 

electricab-1.jpg

Two Electricabs near the Union 76 Skyride. The famous orange 76 logo ball was introduced at the fair.

 

electricab-2.jpg

An Electricab and the larger Fairliners.

 

electricab-3.jpg

Colonel Parker and Elvis Presley on an Electricab

Edited by Bill Cotter

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Thanks Bill!

I see that the Electricab driver's nametag says Air-Mac, just like on the pedicabs. I guess Air-Mac must have had the concession for ground transportation.

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electricab-1.jpg

Two Electricabs near the Union 76 Skyride. The famous orange 76 logo ball was introduced at the fair.

Yeah, those orange balls are history, replaced by red balls when Union merged with Conoco/Phillips in 2005-06. THEY say they're still orange, but anybody in their right mind can see they're now red. :)

Hey, what's that on the right on the souvenir table? Some kind of 3-D Viewmaster viewers that worked with strips instead of disks? Or are they regular 3-D viewers, with just coincidentally packages of commercial slides hanging behind them?

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By the way, those Fairliners were just plain ugly. :D

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I'm not quite sure what that was. Here's a full-size view.

unknown-souvenir.jpg

I would have said packs of souvenir slides except for the orange rectangle.

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Interesting.

I thought the regular commercial slide packs looked like this:

SEATTLEwfSLIDESlight.jpg

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There were also slides from Technicolor, Morley Studios and others. Albert Fisher did ID the package above - I have to run out so I'll let him or Randy fill in the details.

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Yes, Albert and George Mack nailed it for us.

Albert even told us about how much it cost and showed an unopened package from his own collection....

Here's 2 photos of the souvenier from my personal collection. It is NOT 3-D ... just a set of 3 slide strips of 7 color photos perstrip (21 total) with a viewer. Was sold by Sawyer who also make the Tru-Vue 3-D circular slide viewers. It sold in 1962 at the fair for about $2.50

858473_10151456136954169_1166029765_o.jp

857365_10151456136789169_643169780_o.jpg

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