Why be on TV when you can be in TV?

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Wayne - I just put these on eBay but thought you might get a smile out of these. What can you tell us about the TV set?

Let's turn the clock back to the days long ago when a broken television set meant a repairman would come out to your house, and if he couldn't fix it, would issue those dreaded words "I have to take it to the shop". That usually meant the empty cabinet stood there silently reminding you of all of the shows you were missing until the innards were fixed and returned. Well, just like Lucille Ball did on "I Love Lucy", these two young girls decided to put on their own show inside the empty cabinet.

crosley-1.jpg

crosley-2.jpg

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The second girl looks like maybe it's become the family "time out corner". :o

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Do you have a scan large enough to read the logos? All I can tell off hand is that it's a 21 inch black and white upright console from the 50's or later. Will have to post to Videokarma for further ID.

I imagine the serviceman took all that stuff off the top before pulling the chassis, and Mrs. TV owner put it back. Those girls are lucky they didn't tip over the lamp.

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It just says "Super" on the left and "Crosley" on the right. I can rescan at a larger size if you still want them.

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Where are the knobs to turn the channel? Maybe this one had an early remote control.

Actually, it looks like in '55 or '56 Crosley moved their controls to the side of the box (where we can't see it in Bill's photos), with something on the top also (maybe telescoping rabbit ears?). It looks like there's something in this same position on top of the box in Bill's photos--- and maybe the repairman partially disassembled something and left it there 'til he can get back.

http://www.tvhistory...Crosley-Ad2.jpg

Also note in both of Bill's photos- INSIDE the box to the right of the girls, there is a hole in the box. This was probably the connector hole from the channel-changer control knobs to the chassis innards.

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Actually, it looks like in '55 or '56 Crosley moved their controls to the side of the box (where we can't see it in Bill's photos), with something on the top also (maybe telescoping rabbit ears?). It looks like there's something in this same position on top of the box in Bill's photos--- and maybe the repairman partially disassembled something and left it there 'til he can get back.

Yep- it was called a Zoom-a-tenna !

$(KGrHqZ,!jYE651HfCeDBOu9(LCnHg~~60_3.JPG

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Wayne, have you ever heard of a "7-League Chassis"?

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Here's a bigger and cleaner scan. I believe those are the set knobs on top near the vase.

crosley-3.jpg

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Wayne, have you ever heard of a "7-League Chassis"?

Not until now!

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She wanted to be seen in the magic mirror on Romper Room. :P

How about that description of the Vertical Plane Chassis- 'puts controls on the side - where they belong!'

That lasted what- a year or two? I'm sure the claim had something to do with the controls being mechanical rather than electronic... maybe they were 'where they belong' from an engineering standpoint in an era where engineering often trumped consumer preference.

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The knobs were on the side of a lot of the portables of the 1950s and early '60s, too. My grandmother owned a trailer park and we supplied a TV in all 40 of the trailers. Some of them seemed like antiques even back in the 1960s. We had a TV repairman who was practically on staff! Emile Theberge was his name. I was continually fascinated when he opened that case he always carried with him. When there was a problem, we'd switch out the TV with a different one. Every few weeks Emile would stop in and pick up the bad ones and drop off a couple fixed ones. It seemed so normal at the time!

As I remember, most were metal cased and looked like this 1955 GE.

post-86-0-08853800-1321481563_thumb.jpg

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Controls one the side was marketing as much as engineering. People thought (or could be convinced by ad copy) that the set looked neater without all those knobs showing. Since the cabinet already had to be deep for the early picture tubes, why not go for "more compact" by putting controls on the side?

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I would imagine they were not as easy to see though.

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Wayne - I just put these on eBay but thought you might get a smile out of these. What can you tell us about the TV set?

Let's turn the clock back to the days long ago when a broken television set meant a repairman would come out to your house, and if he couldn't fix it, would issue those dreaded words "I have to take it to the shop". That usually meant the empty cabinet stood there silently reminding you of all of the shows you were missing until the innards were fixed and returned. Well, just like Lucille Ball did on "I Love Lucy", these two young girls decided to put on their own show inside the empty cabinet.

crosley-1.jpg

crosley-2.jpg

Ha ha cute pictures! I'll see if I can dig up the ones I have doing the same thing in a similarly gutted tv set.

The tv repair man didn't come up to our house, but my father had a Telefixit book and he was constantly bringing tubes down to the drug store to check them. The drug stores had tube testers and sold tubes. If my father couldn't fix it we had to haul the thing down to the tv repair shop. Those tv's required constant tinkering - and the rabbit ear antennas did too.

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img0419h.jpg

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Boy, I wish I had one of those books back in the days I was seemingly always testing tubes at the drug store. We had one TV that seemed to cycle through every tube about once a year. The trouble was I never knew which one it was that particular day, so all the tubes would come out and all would get tested.

I imagine even finding tubes today for vintage sets must be quite a challenge,

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Actually, finding most tubes is not too difficult in the quantities restorers need (as long as they are not weird multi-function tubes or those with odd filament voltages); however, some of the prices for tubes originally used in TVs have been run up as they are sometimes repurposed these days for use in tube audio amps.

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