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Here's the site plan for the Texas Centennial. You can click here for a larger version:

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Also interesting to note is that the Dallas Historical Society has the original blueprints, sketches, and construction models for nearly every building of the Texas Centennial. These make up part of the thousands of items in their Centennial Collection. Unfortunately most of these items remain in storage for now, but there are plans to display them in a future museum at Fair Park. Their collection includes many of the original sketches for murals and maquettes for sculptures and it's very fascinating. These items have been very useful in recent years in helping restore the existing architecture of Fair Park.

I was up at their warehouse the other day and shot these photos of one of the models.

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This book has some great photographs and details about the park's architecture: http://www.amazon.co...s/dp/0738579394

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thank you dfw !!

World's Fair / Expo site maps are one of the most helpful things. I try to save all that I find, and this expo was one where I didn't have a map. Much appreciated.

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Randy, I agree with you on the helpfulness of Expo site maps. Some of them are wonderful works of graphic arts, most notably those for NYWF 64-65, Expo 67 and Expo 70.

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Yes, thanks a lot for sharing, dfw. I've said before on PTU that the Texas Fair Park has done such a remarkable job of preserving it's history, that walking across those grounds is like stepping back in time to one of the great Expos of the 30's.

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Yes, thanks a lot for sharing, dfw. I've said before on PTU that the Texas Fair Park has done such a remarkable job of preserving it's history, that walking across those grounds is like stepping back in time to one of the great Expos of the 30's.

Yes, it really is a cultural treasure for the city. Over the past few years there has been a lot of focus on preserving and restoring the Art Deco architecture. Of course many of the structures predate the exposition, so several of them are approaching a century of use.

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