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Bill Cotter

A definite "Oh crap" moment

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Just imagine that you have gone through the hassle and expense of getting a concession at the Fair. You get the place built, hire the staff, then decide to go for a ride on the monorail and see how it looks from up above.

orange-julius-1.jpg

Wow. The thrill of ownership. The pride of entrepreneurship.

Until you take a closer look.

orange-julius-2.jpg

Then comes the joy of firing the sign painter.

(Sadly, the Orange Julius concessionaire ended up with far bigger problems, for the failure of the Texas Pavilions ended up making this a money losing proposition.)

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This letter that Eric Paddon found six years ago is almost comical. You want to read it and say 'wait a minute, NOBODY's business could be THAT bad!' I mean, you'd think they could clear more than $31.00 a day even in sub-zero temperatures. Employees abandoning the place. :P

And then to top it all, the sign painter even painted the 'S' backward on the roof.

This was truly the Rodney Dangerfield of World's Fair concessionaires. "No respect!" rodney-dangerfield.jpg

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Does anyone know how much one Orange Julius serving cost?

If the cost was 25 cents per cup (which seems low for 1964), then their low $31 per day averages to 124 customers.  Figuring on a 12 hour day (roughly), that amounts to one sale every 5.8 minutes.  If my math is correct (big if), then that's not too bad (but not great) for a low traffic area such as the Lake Amusement Area.  (A lower cost per serving would increase the number of sales.  Conversely, a higher cost per serving would decrease the number of sales)

What were they expecting?

Blame Texas, not the Fair.

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Bill, do you think that roof sign painter had any ragrets??

(With a nod to the idiot carnival employee in "We're The Millers.")

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Considering nobody would be likely to see the backward S, I don't see what publicity it would garner.  I'll bet it was just a dumb error .

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The mistake is so absurd that it cries out for a reason. Here is my suggestion. The painter was getting very uncomfortable squatting down on that angled roof. Suddenly he had the urge to go to the bathroom. On returning, he wanted to avoid squatting, so he sprawled out on the opposite side. No problem, he could just paint the "S" upside down. That usually takes a little forethought for proper orientation, which he didn't think about because his lunch at Mastro Pizza was beginning to give him heartburn.

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Check out the third bullet down.

 

348s (1).jpg

My first thought was maybe the backward S was intentional- a whimsical marketing thing.  But then I see it doesn't match the other sign just a few feet away.

Screenshot_20190729-221346.png

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This is very difficult to read on my little smartphone screen, but it appears the construction company who built infrastructure for the Log Flume, Orange Julius and several other in that area of the Amusement Zone, filed suit against them for non payment, and then filed a "mechanics lien" to foreclose and take them over, and it went all the way to the New York Supreme Court.

Maybe one of you legal eagles with better eyes than me can make more sense out of it, and tell us what the Supreme Court decided.

https://books.google.com/books/about/New_York_Supreme_Court_Appellate_Divisio.html?id=qoUekpHmehcC

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Randy, that link seems to go to a 1950s case involving Texaco (?).  

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The last pages in the thing deal with the Fair and the operator of the Flume ride.     But it was hard for me to figure out.

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2 hours ago, waynebretl said:

Randy, that link seems to go to a 1950s case involving Texaco (?).  

and

1 hour ago, Eric Paddon said:

The last pages in the thing deal with the Fair and the operator of the Flume ride.     But it was hard for me to figure out.

 

Randy, the last few pages (of the court record) make mention of a "shell" company dealing with the Log Flume ride, but it's hard to figure out what is actually being argued.  

But your first post indicates that Orange Julius was to be the "official" drink of the 1964-1965 World's Fair.  This is the first I heard of this, so they couldn't have marketed it very well, or at all.

 

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NYS is unusual in that the highest court in the state is not the Supreme Court.  Instead it is the NYS Court of Appeals.  Anything decided by the NYS Supreme Court may be upheld or overturned by the NYS Court of Appeals.

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