Jump to content


Photo

Expo 2010 demolition


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 gary h

gary h

    Likes World's Fairs

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 363 posts

Posted 27 November 2010 - 10:02 AM

Hi, I can't find much on the web about the Expo demolition - am still looking for a site showing a full master plan for post-expo use.

But did come across this one blog about the expo's dismantling:

http://shanghaishiok...-expo/#more-814

#2 Jim

Jim

    Never Logs Off

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,936 posts

Posted 09 December 2010 - 06:12 PM

I found a site called "Eight Hours At The World's Largest Demolition Site" and it discusses the demolition of Expo 2010 and includes photographs.
All I did was google demolition fo Expo 2010 and it was the very first link. There are many before and after photos of various pavilions. It all reminds me of the photographs of the demolition of the NYWF that have been posted here. Check it out.

#3 worldsfairent

worldsfairent

    Pacific Coast PTU'er

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,208 posts

Posted 09 December 2010 - 06:44 PM

That's the same site that Gary linked above, Jim. ;)

#4 Bill Cotter

Bill Cotter

    Master Builder

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,841 posts

Posted 09 December 2010 - 07:41 PM

It's a great link and well worth checking out. Thanks, Gary - and Jim!

#5 Jim

Jim

    Never Logs Off

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,936 posts

Posted 15 December 2010 - 05:55 PM

Ooops, I did not realize it was the same link. What kills me is that, once again, a gigantic fair has come and gone and is now being pounded into rubble. It certainly suggests that China is making the same mistakes Europe and North America made in their respective rise to industrial and economic power--the irresponsible waste of natural resources. Trouble is that, today, this waste is completely unnecessary. We know better. I wonder why the planners in China did not consider post-fair use.

#6 Bill Cotter

Bill Cotter

    Master Builder

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,841 posts

Posted 15 December 2010 - 08:01 PM

Most of the wonderfully odd buildings that look so wonderful in a fair setting don't translate well to practical post-fair use. Plus it costs more to build them to lasting standards than if they were only needed for a shorter run.

It still hurts to see the walls come tumbling down though.

#7 Jim

Jim

    Never Logs Off

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,936 posts

Posted 16 December 2010 - 10:34 AM

I fully understand this, of course. Fairs are ephemeral events.

Nevertheless, one would think that in 2010 a city or a nation might actually consider how to make the wisest use of resources and money when planning a fair. If Seattle could successfully consider and plan post-fair use of their structures and their site in 1962, then 48 years (and dozens of demolished fairs) later, shouldn't we have moved further along in that process? And if total demolition with no plan for post-fair use is to continue in exposition design, then what American city will EVER be able to sincerely consider hosting such an event in an age of dwindling resources, declining revenues and unbalanced budgets? It is not the same America as it was during the economically difficult times in 1939 when the future seemed glorious.

This is why I think China believes that the Shanghai exposition will help introduce their massive economic power to the modern world. But they used a 19th century model to do this. They built a huge fair, spent massive amounts of money, used vast amounts of resources, altered the landscape, attracted 70 million plus people (although only about 2% were from outside of China) and then began the process of nearly total demolition of the site. They lost a remarkable opportunity to construct a stunning exposition whose structures would, at least in some part, remain to enhance the life of that massive city. What a lesson to the world it would have been to show the way a 21st century economic powerhouse will build its economy yet sustain the environment, conserve resources and actually recognize the fact that today becomes tomorrow and that we have to plan for the future--if not for ourselves, then at least for our children.

This, however, will not be China's policy and we have already seen this with their coal burning plants belching soot and smoke, their gigantic dams altering human and natural environments and the list goes on. Again, in their rush to economic superiority, they are making the same mistakes made by European and North American nations in the 19th and 20th centuries. And the cost to all of us will be staggering.

Those who do not remember history, are condemned to repeat it.

#8 Mandy

Mandy

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 04 March 2011 - 10:27 AM

The demolition process is very wasteful and unsustainable too, but that is not solely china's fault, all the pavilions and building were made to be designed with intended further post expo use and that is down to each of the participants' (counties tourism board or company) responsibility. And the money spent is each of the participants as well. After the expo each of the participant deals with what to do with their own pavilion, sometimes they hold up auctions, or donate them or use it themselves. Even though the pavilions are meant to be designed with consideration of post expo use, they are mainly designed with just the expo in mind which is during the summer, making the pavilions not adaptable for other cold weather which is useless. China themselves have agreed to keep their own major structure pavilions and the boulevard . Most of the expos stuff (e.g. toilets, benches, sunbrellas , food trolleys..etc) are being resold and reused somewhere else.

Several shanghai NGO organisation is taking the waste from some of the pavilions and using it to build schools with it. To reuse the expo structures materials is a very hard thing to do and usually only sustainably for close proximity , either only some parts are reused within the hosting countries or other countries take it back to their country. But that's still cost a lot of transporting a building across the world. UAE is one of the countries which is taking back their own pavilion back to UAE to be rebuilt as a museum. The pavilion is wonderfully designed and a lot of thought and technology has gone into it. This is all due to the UAE tourism board's investment and the reason it works so well is because they are going through development of their Saadiyat island region which created the demand for it .

The post expo demolition and teardown is not the most desirable for an Expo that had such good reputation and vast participation but the reality of the sustainability of post expo resource use is quite difficult due to ownerships, policies and the sustainability of the actual design.

In saying that I do wish and agree more could be done to reduce the waste at the expo and that more of the spectacular buildings can be preserved.





Mandy



#9 worldsfairent

worldsfairent

    Pacific Coast PTU'er

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,208 posts

Posted 04 March 2011 - 01:07 PM

Agree with all of the above-- but judging by how the rest of Shanghai has exploded over the past 20 years in terms of its urban development-- I wouldn't be at all surprised if the entire EXPO 2010 site is filled with skyscrapers by the time America (hopefully) hosts Expo 2020.

#10 Jim

Jim

    Never Logs Off

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,936 posts

Posted 06 March 2011 - 06:12 PM

Maybe the Soviets had a decent idea as regards their pavilions at 20th Century expositions. They dismantled them and took them home and found some sort of reuse.

I realize that not every pavilion at such an enormous exposition may be designed to be saved for permanent use, but for god's sake, wasn't there some civic need in Shanghai (museums, schools, libraries, research centres, civic auditoriums etc.) for which the largest pavilions could have been designed? I would bet that the enormity of the Shanghai exposition, and smashing all records appears to have been China's goal, will result in one other record for China: the world's largest landfill.

If demolition is the only practical end for 21st century expositions, then they truly are a vehicle of the past and a burden on the environment and the taxpayer.

#11 Randy Treadway

Randy Treadway

    Master Builder

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,370 posts

Posted 06 March 2011 - 06:18 PM

Maybe they can design a pavilion that is biodegradable. Or could be turned into fuel for 2,000 Chinese Buicks.

#12 Randy Treadway

Randy Treadway

    Master Builder

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,370 posts

Posted 06 March 2011 - 06:23 PM

Better yet, a pavilion that can be eaten.

They called the main Olympic Stadium in Beijing the 'Bird's Nest'. Wouldn't it be cool if it really had been noodles in a traditional Chinese bird's nest? When the Olympics were over they could have invited all the residents of Beijing to a big party, and eat the place.

Anybody want to eat a German Gingerbread House?

#13 Jim

Jim

    Never Logs Off

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,936 posts

Posted 06 March 2011 - 08:09 PM

I remember a movie, "My Brother Talks To Horses (1947)." One of the characters invents an edible beer bottle. I can't remember for sure, but I think that it was pretzel flavored. As one drank the beer, the bottle could be eaten. Talk about a brilliant recycling solution.

And I completely agree that edible pavilions would solve a multitude of global problems. They could be built of relatively natural and renwable resources. They could be slowly chipped away by hungry visitors who would save a ton of loot on restaurant costs. What is not fully eaten could be fed to birds and chipmunks and other furry critters. The German gingerbread house is an excellent start.

I remember that Heinz actually tried to hold out for a pickle shaped pavilion in 1939 but the NYWF Corporation vetoed that idea. In retrospect, that really was a poor environmental decision. Who doesn't like a tasty pickle?

Great idea, Randy!!
Jim

#14 worldsfairent

worldsfairent

    Pacific Coast PTU'er

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,208 posts

Posted 07 March 2011 - 11:48 PM

Article about post Expo 2010 site plans:

Shanghai Daily

#15 worldsfairent

worldsfairent

    Pacific Coast PTU'er

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,208 posts

Posted 16 March 2011 - 11:13 AM

Latest info on Expo 2010 site re-use plans. Looks like they really are repurposing a number of the former Pavilions...

Riverfront Rehab

Saudi Pavilion Reopening




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users