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  1. Hi everyone. It is rather rare to have a chance to have a glimpse of the interior of the 1939 NYWF impressive pavilions, namely those of invited foreign nations. I have assembled high resolution photographs depicting some Art and Facts stuff from "my" Portuguese pavilion. Back in 1939, Portugal was under a fascist-ike dictatorship known as Estado Novo (Modern State), which would endure for some 40 years. Back then, Portugal was proud of its huge overseas empire and its long history of 800 years - Europe's oldest border defined country. Those reasons - and mentality - may account for the lack of modernism or deco style of the pavilion's architecture. Apart from the huge vitrine displaying a "popular" themed mural, the building resembles a medieval castle and sadly reminds me of portuguese post offices (these were all remodeled during that period, the 30's). Inside, modernism is slightly more awake, if one may say so. If you are interested, you may click the photos to see the details. I'm not writing any detail, although I do know what the many artistic compositions represent. Please "enter" the pavilion and enjoy. We are in 1939... Kind regards, Luis
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