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Showing most liked content since 08/24/2018 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    I love this community. Its members are passionate about world's fairs and the combined knowledge stored here is vast and deep. The passion is a double-edged sword and eventually it wore me out. Occasionally things got negative, heated. People disagree with the choices you make. Some people stop talking to you. Some people end up hating you. Over the years the hobby started feeling more like a job and my passion waned. I'd look through old posts and wonder if I'd made the right decisions. My social visits became less frequent. I'd check in to ensure everything was running and not recognize the people posting. That's when I decided to hand the site over to Bill C. Like many have previously stated, the community is still here and vital. Nearly two decades after Bill Y. invited me to join him. That's something to celebrate and be proud of!
  2. 4 points
    I recently joined or re-discovered a couple of the Facebook groups regarding the Fair so it was interesting to me to read the comments about Facebook. I was surprised to see how little has been posted on the Facebook groups in the past few years. On the other hand, this bulletin board is alive with continuous postings from people with an interest. I don't think a day goes by that I check here that I don't see and read something new. So LONG LIVE the World's Fair Community! In this day and age of Facebook, it is still THE PLACE to go for people who share a love of World's Fairs! You all make this a great place to visit.
  3. 3 points
    I can relate to the noble but weary task of checking things out. Rumour went around that an attractive female in my company was moonlighting at a local burlesque theater. Someone had to take on the task of confirming the truth, and I selflessly volunteered. It was true!
  4. 3 points
    Thanks for the post, Glen. Always good to hear from you. Happily we haven't had too many problems with trolls, and we do our best to take care of them as fast as possible when they surface. And I do try to keep politics, at least current ones, out of here so there's a place I can go without having to wory about the Argument of the Day from some folks on Facebook, etc. I plan on moving the board to a new host this summer, and will see what can be done about those missing images at that time. Same basic software, just a different hosting company.
  5. 3 points
    I just want to thank you again, Marc-- for funneling your passion into the original PTU-- for inviting me to be an Admin-- and for graciously allowing Bill to carry the site forward. I don't post as much as I used to, either. But man, oh man, am I glad the World's Fair Community is still around.
  6. 3 points
    After YEARS of delay, finally construction has started. Still don't know how much will get done and how fast, but the excellent and very much in demand "construction guy", Howie, is hot on it now and has done this much in two days, with the wood base cut and ready, but still not in place. However, the frame is almost complete. Most of the glass and plexi have to be replaced, but I am trying to figure out something to do with the original WF pieces of glass (only a few were not damaged in the taking down of the church/pavilion in Poway). We're waiting on the new glass and plexi, so that might be a short delay, as they are all custom pieces. Enjoy, news as it happens.
  7. 2 points
    This pavilion had some lovely room displays, as well as exhibits of decorative items. I was pleased to watch an artist carve a wooden wall hanging that was very popular in those days. This is an exhibit by International Silver. I was surprised to see my own portrait in the mirror! Artist at work. Example of a finished wall hanging.
  8. 2 points
    My family waited for quite a few pavilion attractions and this was one of therm. I agree some, today, might not elect to wait for an attraction like this, but in 1965, we sure did. It wasn't even open for discussion. GE was a highly regarded company and its pavilion won all sorts of praise, if not from official critics, it did come from the millions of regular folks who visited the Fair. And the GE presentation was novel and remarkably creative for 1965. We didn't have personal computers and most didn't even have color television yet. So a demonstration like the Carousel of Progress where the audience moved around the presentation which used robotic creations that seemed so life like was a wonder of that era. The entire Fair was filled with such wonders and it was our great good fortune that we all stood in long lines and waited to get in. Those lines were a testament to the marvels inside and they have allowed me a lifetime of happy memories.
  9. 2 points
    The Twilight Zone... Maybe that is Global 33, the jet liner on route from London to NYC in 1961 that broke the sound and time barrier and found itself lost over New York City in 1939 with the world's fair below them . If "you hear the sound of jet engines flyings atop the overcast--engines that sound searching and lost--engines that sound desperate--shoot up a flare or do something. That would be Global 33 trying to get home--from The Twilight Zone." --Rod Serling, February 24, 1961 (episode 54)
  10. 2 points
    After having scanned thousands of slides from the Fair it's always fun to spot something new. Here's a view of a sign advertising "Disneyland Fun - Pepsi World's Fair Pavilion" on the way in to the Gotham Gate from the subway. I've never seen that sign before. It did it's best to hide in the shadows, as seen in the original scan. Newly restored 126 format slide from August 1965. and the original scan:
  11. 2 points
    ****WARNING: Long, Rambling Post Alert!**** Thank you, Trey! And I think this response might be indicative of what happened to so many of the regulars around here. When I came back and saw this thread I kinda made a promise to myself that I would come around more often and keep up with everything going on in the forums. Then...a month-and-a-half passed before I came back and saw your post above! No excuse, it's just what it is. The interesting thing about a community like this is that the one thing we all know about each other is that we all have at least ONE thing in common. And the whole point of this site is to celebrate that common interest. But of course we all have complete lives that contain so many other interests, commitments, responsibilities and so on... I'll bet many former members still (and always will) have that passion they feel/felt for the Fair, but other things just had to take precedence. I might try to reach out to a couple of the people mentioned in the OP to see if they might drop by to check in. We'll see if I actually get around to doing that! Trey, I also consider you a good friend, and am ever-thankful to this board for "introducing" me to you and so many others who I wouldn't have met otherwise, but who I now consider to be friends (yes, even if it's only an online friendship). When I first discovered the board I had only been "into" World's Fairs for a few years. At first it was exclusively 1939-40 (as I believe was the case with you at one point as well, correct Trey?). Then it spread to 1964-65. As mentioned earlier I was born a few years after the 1964-65 NYWF gates closed for good. So, unlike many of the original members, I had never had the opportunity to actually attend the Fair. But The wealth of information that everyone had and the passion for the subject really drew me in. I lurked for about a year and didn't actually join and start posting until someone here actually posted about ME when I had put up a display of my collection at the Worcester Public Library for the 40th anniversary of the '64 Fair (and 75th anniversary of '39). I quickly went from a "newbie" who knew practically nothing about the Fairs into being at least well-versed in the subject. Friends and family probably considered me to be an expert on the Fairs, but I knew the true experts were here. Like Trey mentioned, Facebook groups are riddled with inaccuracies that you don't really find here. If something incorrect is stated someone will more likely than not correct it. The FB groups are kind of like Wikipedia, while the WFC feels a bit more like a true encyclopedia, even if it is being "published" by its members. While I've rarely find myself visiting over the past few years, I love the fact that I can still get here by typing "pea" into my computer. It still autofills "peacethroughunderstanding.org" and clicking that STILL brings me here (yes, that DOES also say something not so good about the age of my computer, but that's another story). I feel that old name really did mean a lot to the board beyond being the theme of the Fair. There really did seem to be a lot of peace and understanding between members. It was like a micro-version of what the Fair proposed to accomplish--on a small community scale. Like I mentioned above, we all have different things that mean something to us, but we all have the Fair(s) in common. If we started veering from that (as is likely to happen in Facebook or other places) I'm sure that peace would have been short-lived. The few members who would come along and seem to only want to cause trouble or start something (ie: trolls) would quickly learn that this community didn't go for that. They'd usually calm down and join in on the fun--or possibly be banned. I can't say I've ever seen much in the way of politics being discussed here, and that makes me glad. Politics are extremely important, but also extremely polarizing. And, obviously, that's not the reason I come here. Sorry, I got long-winded once again. Oh well, that's just what I do I guess!
  12. 2 points
    When I was a teenager, back in the 1980s (gasp!), I met a hand full of folks that worked at the Great Lakes Exposition including a lovely lady who was a swimmer in the Aquacade. She said it was quite awful swimming in the lake, particularly towards the end of the expo. It got to the point where they coated themself with a Vaseline type substance to ward off the cold.
  13. 2 points
    That water looks to be brutally cold. Buster Crabbe replaced Johnny Weissmuller in NY in 1939 and Gertrude Ederle joined the swimmers in 1939. As a total aside, TCM ran the film Sunday In New York a few weeks ago. Filmed on location in NYC in 1963, it stars Jane Fonda, Rod Taylor and Cliff Robertson. Simply because of the date the movie was created, I wondered if I might spot something, anything, that would make reference to the upcoming 1964 NYWF. And I did find something. On Fifth Avenue in front of the mezzanine one leading to the ice rink at Rockefeller Center, a NYC metro bus stops to either take on or discharge Fonda and Taylor. There, on the front of the bus is an advertisement for The 1964 New York World's Fair. I had been watching the, advertising cards inside of the various bus scenes but could not spot a Fair reference and then I spotted the advertising card on the front of the bus. It's a small find, I realize, but it made my day.
  14. 2 points
    I found a nice surprise at the front door today - the first copies of my newest book! It's always a thrill to finally hold the final product in your hands after months of work. Street date is December 10.
  15. 2 points
    Welcome back, Glen. You're one of many friends I've made here-- and I'm very grateful for that. I will say one thing about the Facebook groups I'm a part of that are devoted to various Fairs and Expos-- I often find them frustratingly full of incorrect information. I think that's one of the things that first drew me to this website many moons ago. The members here don't just share a common interest in World's Fairs-- many of them have an extremely impressive level of knowledge about their history, planning, construction, exhibits, social impact, demolition, and legacies. In fact, it's hard to name a major World's Fair or Expo that you can't do some kind of deep dive research here on the WFC thanks to the thousands of posts and photos our members have made. Even after the numerous board crashes that unfortunately deleted links and pictures in the past (which may have been a contributing factor in forcing some of its early members to exit)-- in my opinion, this website still remains a preeminent source of factual information on the World's Fairs and Expos of yesterday and today.
  16. 2 points
    I found all the passports for our whole family in my vault.I was so relentless with getting mine stamped they had to issue my passport 2 times.... Every page jam packed. The UK stamp was unique on the queen birthday June 10th , 1967. That day only the stamp was issued with real gold . I know as I had it tested and they used gold laden ink..To this day it still shines bright inside my passport.
  17. 2 points
    Considering the way people drive cars on land, we may have dodged a bullet by not getting jetpacks and flying cars.
  18. 2 points
    It's Birds Eye Awake "frozen concentrate for orange-flavored breakfast drink."
  19. 2 points
    Good times and bum times, I've seen them all and, Sunguar, I'm still here.....since September 10, 2000!
  20. 2 points
    Facebook makes it hard to find anything more than a few days old. Never mind that they're continually tweaking what you see at all. I'd much rather visit a few different blogs and boards like this every day than trust Facebook for things I'm interested in.
  21. 2 points
    Hi suguar! I have a feeling a number of us have become "lurkers" more so than "posters." In my case, I still watch "the board" but just don't post often unless I have something to advertise that's new at nywf64.com The names you mention go "way back" to the early days when "PTU" as it was called then was a part of nywf64.com. "Way back" is going on 19 years ago! It's hard to believe that this bulletin board in one form or another has been around for that long! Some of the names you've mentioned I've lost track of as well. Others, like Mike Kraus, Liz Klug and Ken Thalheimer, Mary Ellen Coughlan, John McSweeny still have an interest in the Fair but just don't post here often any more. Interests change over 19 years too. I also think that part of the reason why you don't see some of the older names posting any more is that the "newness" of it might have worn off for some of them. You have to realize that 19 years ago, discovering that there were actually other people "out there" who share this interest was a big thing to us. All those years ago there just wasn't that much online that you could explore about the 1964/1965 New York World's Fair or other Fairs. Now, search Google for "1964 York Fair" and you will come up with a myriad of links to places to visit on the web that have a connection to the Fairs, be it UTube or any number of places where folks have posted their photos and memories. In 2000, PTU was actually a bit like a social club where people with a fascination for World's Fairs could "hang-out." It's still that way today but maybe just not as shiny and new as it was nearly two decades ago.
  22. 2 points
    Another celebrity sighting in a NYWF photo. "The blonde in this photograph is civil rights pioneer Edie Windsor. I just got an email back from one of her friends confirming it. Edie was an IBM executive. Edie was at the fair a lot. The woman feeding the giraffe is her wife Thea." Google turns some interesting stories about both women.
  23. 2 points
    Alan Abel, a resident of Connecticut and a life long "professional hoaxer," died on Friday. I mention this under general discussion because, in 1964, he and his wife, Jeanne , co-authored a book, The President I Almost Was, supposedly written by Mrs. Yetta Bronstein who ran an independent presidential campaign that year. Yetta formed her own political party (The Best Party) and used the slogan, "Vote For Yetta And Things Will Get Betta." They even handed out campaign materials in front of the White House and many, including members of the press, believed the campaign was real. Mr. Abel, in 1959, also created a bogus campaign known as SINA (Society for Indecency to Naked Animals) and, in 1963, demanded that Mrs. Kennedy, then First Lady, clothe her naked horses especially when riding in the Virginia countryside. Many news organizations, including the NY Times covered his 1963 protest outside of the White House. He proposed clothing any animal that stood taller than four inches and longer than six inches and the press fell for it. I mention all of this because Mr. Abel's hilarious and fictitious account of the 1964 presidential campaign has a chapter devoted to Yetta's campaign swing through the 1964 NY World's Fair. She focuses on her aching feet, the crowds and fair food. Not much is said about the issues of the day because, of course, the whole thing was a hoax. Mr. Abel also has the unique distinction of tricking the NY Times into writing an obituary for him in 1980. Mr. Abel got his family and friends in on the hoax and he went into hiding for several weeks and the Times reported his death of a heart attack with the headline: Alan Abel, Satirist Created Campaign To Clothe Animals. This time, following his death on Friday of this week, the Times did full research to be certain Mr. Abel was, indeed, dead. The Times notes that Mr. Abel "apparently did die" at his Connecticut home on Friday. That bogus obituary, written in full faith in 1980, prompted the Times to print the only retraction for such a fake obituary in its long history. Today's accurate obit calls Mr. Abel "an American original" much like P.T. Barnum. In a crazy world that seems to become nuttier each day, Mr. Abel was a remarkable character who brought humor and joy. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/17/obituaries/alan-abel-dies.html
  24. 2 points
    A little detective work produced this: On January 21, 2014 Bill Cotter posted: "Someone has finally found one of the Hertz strollers used at the Fair. It will be on "American Pickers" on the History Channel at 9 PM ET on January 22. I'm looking forward to seeing it. It's been tough sitting on the news until the show was ready to air." So that would be episode 3, Season 11. (Vermont, New York) Now to find it. (It's available on the History Channel website---stroller starts at 7:11) Gee, I would have bought it for $40.00
  25. 1 point
    Just a name change on the outside to "Demonstration Center".
  26. 1 point
    Here's where I got mine. Not sure if they're still in stock though. https://www.oreillyauto.com/flux-capacitor
  27. 1 point
    Thanks, no need, but appreciated! Let me look for that other photo you wanted and will send it. Been super busy with a wave of LAPD stuff this week, next week is insane!
  28. 1 point
    The whole NACA to Apollo 17 story is great. From Astronauts to Mission Controllers who wrote their stories. I've felt that I've been able to relate to their stories and lives with my work.
  29. 1 point
    - and a look at the slide before restoration. Instamatic 126 format.
  30. 1 point
    This newsreel made me wonder who the uncredited, perky British announcer was-- and it turns out his name was Leslie Mitchell. He had quite a colorful life and career. Leslie Mitchell - Wikipedia
  31. 1 point
  32. 1 point
    Wow after reading Wayne’s post I suddenly remembered a huge aspect of Chrysler that hasn’t been mentioned. Your perceptions of the pavilion being designed for kids is accurate. That is a good distinction from the other auto makers. There was a quiz arena, well documented on this site, where kids would fill little desk stations of some kind and respond to questions. The prize for winning was a model turbine car. Details elude me. I bet they’re here somewhere I vividly recall being the only contestant one evening and the quizmaster giving me several cars! I was born in 1957 so this was one of the greatest things that happened in my life. As far as brand loyalty, I was devoted to GM due to their Futurama ride, and the prototype futuristic cars in the lobby following the ride. We lived in Manhattan and dad worked in Flushing so we went to the fair many times. Chrysler was one of my mandatory stops, scarfing a handful of those 1/24 scale cars over the two years.
  33. 1 point
  34. 1 point
  35. 1 point
    Thanks for posting. Can you provide the aroma?
  36. 1 point
    i really enjoy these. I use the ole cross my eyes trick and it's just beautiful.
  37. 1 point
    Sadly, they just dropped the roof sheets to the floor, smashing the map and shattering the sheets. There was no attempt at all to salvage anything. All of the broken pieces were hauled off to a landfill and buried. One more bad decision in a long and sad series of mistakes made about the pavilion.
  38. 1 point
    I decided to chase medallions a bit more today. It seems that Medallic Art Company was bought by Northwest Territorial Mint some time ago, and this year NWTM underwent a reorganization and sold the assets (dies, etc.) of Medallic Art. I sent a note to NWTM today to ask if they have any records of NYWF business, but I'm guessing it's far too late. We shall see if anything comes of this.
  39. 1 point
    Ever wonder what a luminaire looked like if you stared straight up at one? Wonder no more.
  40. 1 point
    A lot of links were lost in the upgrade - I hope they can be restored.
  41. 1 point
    In Webster Massachusetts - the longest name in the USA: Copied shamelessly from The Boston Globe, sometime in early October, 1997, from the Ask the Globe section. Q. I have heard that there is a lake in Massachusetts with a long name which means "you fish on your side, I fish on mine, nobody fishes in the middle." True or false? If true, where is the lake? P.B., Ipswich A. True. Lake Chargoggagoggmanchoggagogg is a 17-mile-around lake in Webster. (Some sources offer this spelling: Chargoggagoggmanchauggagoggchaubunagungamaugg). The original name of the lake as it appears in ancient deeds was Chabanakongkomom, with fewer letters and easier to pronounce. The Nipmuks gave the body of water this name because it was neutral territory and a favored site for powwows among their tribe and the Narraganssett, Pequot and Mohegan tribes. Residents of Webster have shortened the name, understandably, to Lake Manchaug.
  42. 1 point
    He might have been trying to hijack Tik Tok the Seiko Robot from this guy.... :D
  43. 1 point
    "He runs his own show." That is about as clear a statement about Robert Moses that I have ever read. It is also interesting to consider the idea that if he had not been so antagonistic to the BIE, at least in the view of the Times, that group might have turned a blind eye to its member nations participating in 1964 without their official approval. How unfortunate the conflict unfolded as it did. PS: I have never understood why someone would go to a world's fair and then complain, no less, because the amusement area was not adequate--whatever that means. When I think of NYC in 1964, there were amusement parks all over the area. A world's fair was a once-in-a-lifetime event for most. One can ride a roller coaster anywhere. I understand there was no major attraction in the amusement area in 1964; no giant ferris wheel or parachute jump, but there was so much to see and do without crossing that bridge toward Meadow Lake.
  44. 1 point
    Hi everyone! I noticed a couple of broken spoke wires that hold the orbital rings around the unisphere. There's probably a good deal of multiple redundancy so it shouldn't be an imminent problem but all the same, not good. I didn't see any Parks employees around to tell about this. I'll make a call to 311 in the morning to get a phone number to report this to.
  45. 1 point
    First Man on the Moon indeed! But during the World's Fair, he had yet to fly on anything in space. I can just see one of these kids bringing home the autograph, and their dad saying who did you get? "I don't know, some Armstrong guy. They didn't have any REAL astronauts there today, just this guy. I guess he works for NASA or something."... and a few weeks later it ending up in the trash. Today, of course, that's the autograph that people bid big bucks for, more than any other astronaut.
  46. 1 point
  47. 1 point
    Nice find, Bill. Yeah, those two phones on the side of 7-Up seem to be in a remote spot... can we have an aerial on those? Awesome photo of the 7-Up clock, too! BTW, I smell a rat on that bus removal! And Mike, here's something we spotted in Las Vegas. :blink: Dr. Reefer link
  48. 1 point
    F*** Disney! I will never set foot in one of their parks again. Glad to see their first quarter earnings were down a whopping 32%. Karma does exist. 'It's A Small World' Gets Makeover Addition Of Disney Movie Characters Angers Some, Delights Others By GILLIAN FLACCUS The Associated Press February 4, 2009 More than 40 years after the "It's A Small World" ride opened at Disneyland to promote world peace and showcase the cultures of the world, Disney is populating one of its most beloved attractions with its own trademark vision of the planet: Aladdin, Nemo, Ariel and more than two dozen cartoon characters plucked from its movies. And those aren't the only changes visitors will find when the ride reopens today. Disney has woven a few bars from some of its hit soundtracks into the classic "Small World" melody and added a new America section that includes a nod to the Hollywood Bowl, a quaint farm scene and "Toy Story" characters. Disney says it supplemented the human dolls with make-believe figures to keep the aging ride appealing to younger generations and give it a new twist. Some angry fans see an unabashed marketing ploy that trashes the pacifist message at the heart of the ride and ruins one of the few rides that remained unchanged since the days of Walt Disney. "What message are they actually saying about the world?" said Jerry Beck, an animation historian who runs the blog Cartoon Brew. "That you can go anywhere and there will be a Disney theme park?" The added figures from a dozen movies include the blue alien Stitch, the mermaid Ariel, and characters from the 1992 movie "Aladdin." "Disney wants to brand the diversity of the entire world and somehow say that it's Disney derived," said Leo Braudy, a cultural historian at USC. "It seems a bit crass to put this brand on something that was meant to be a sort of United Nations for children." The "Small World" ride debuted at the 1964 World's Fair in New York as a benefit to the United Nations Children's Fund and moved to Disneyland two years later. When Walt Disney dedicated the ride in 1966, he invited children from around the world to pour water from their homelands into its flume in a gesture of unity. Replicas have opened at Disney theme parks in Florida, Tokyo, Paris and Hong Kong, and company research shows that a quarter of all Disneyland guests consider the ride a family tradition. Disney says it hopes adding what it calls "new magic" to the 43-year-old attraction will attract even more riders and create new traditions for young families who don't identify with "Small World" as strongly as previous generations. The makeover appeals to many fans, some of whom grew up riding it each year with their parents. Adding characters, such as Alice and the White Rabbit, have some longtime fans shouting, "Off with their heads." Dawn Barbour visited Disneyland from Texas with her children and was disappointed to find the ride closed for renovations but thrilled to hear about the changes. "Oh, anything Disney does is always exciting," Barbour said. "It's always something fun, and they never do anything halfway." Disney designers say routine repairs gave them an opportunity to add another dimension to the message of cross-cultural understanding by working in references to Disney movies that are based on foreign fairy tales or set in faraway lands. Whenever Disney changes a popular ride, they say, the company receives criticism from die-hard fans who are resistant to anything that will alter the Disneyland of their childhood memories. So-called "Dis-nerds" also got upset when Disney refurbished the classic Pirates of the Caribbean attraction but were mollified once they saw the updated ride. Designers insist the changes to "Small World" are even more subtle and conform to Walt Disney's original philosophy and style while keeping the attraction from becoming "like a museum," said Kim Irvine, director of concept design for Walt Disney Imagineering. The son of the ride's original designer, children's illustrator Mary Blair, wrote an open letter to Disney executives blasting the changes. "The Disney characters themselves are positive company icons, but they do NOT fit in with the original theme of the ride," wrote Kevin Blair. "They will do nothing except marginalize the rightful stars of the ride, 'the children of the world.' " Marty Sklar, executive vice president of Walt Disney Imagineering, responded with his own letter, which was quickly posted on dozens of blogs and appeased some fans. "We are not trying to turn this classic attraction into a marketing pitch for Disney plush toys," Sklar wrote. But some longtime Disney watchers disagree. "Parents ... could take the kids on this ride and it wasn't so much about sales; it was about the images, the graphics, the dolls," said Al Lutz, a veteran Disney watcher who runs miceage.com. "It was a respite from the overwhelming commercial message that Disney can be sometimes."
  49. 1 point
    Bill, that is really true. In all of these random photographs from the Fair, I don't believe I have seen images of truly large people as we see so often today. I also think the idea of "supersizing" has caused enormous problems (no pun intended) as regards health in this nation today.
  50. 1 point
    IF YOUR GONNA POST THIS, I RATHER YOU POST NOTHING AT ALL. My father had something special once. He died and it was lost forever. and no one cared. sincerely Vladimir Obviously I don't like a giant watermark either. This is not e-bay, where it is evident someone wants to earn a buck. As time goes by,,, there will be very few people alive from that wonderful fair and it will not be very special anymore.
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