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  2. Biosphere

    Thank you for your help with this. I agree. Montreal must not let the Dome fall into disrepair. It's a treasure and perhaps it's time to restore its to its original grandeur.
  3. Yesterday
  4. Biosphere

    Here's the link, Jim. And I've deleted your duplicate post. Thanks for sharing this info-- hopefully Montreal will preserve such an important part of its Expo history! Biosphere Fate Uncertain
  5. The National Observer (April 15, 2019) has a story about the potential fate of the former USA pavilion on Ile Ste Helene. Evidently, its lease runs out at the end of 2019 and its fate is uncertain. According to the article by Carl Meyer, it may not survive as the Biosphere. That's the point. Its future is murky and the structure is in need of serious work. I just don't know how to provide the link but all I did was search Expo 67; click on news and scroll down several news stories and there it is.
  6. He went to the office and did business just like Ward Cleaver, Jim Anderson and all those 1950s guys. More to the point, perhaps, what did Mrs. B do all day while Hazel was busy being her maid? One more thought: In the final season, Mr. B went missing. He was supposedly doing "business" in Saudi Arabia for the entire season. In fact, both parents went missing and Harold stayed behind so as not to interrupt his schooling.
  7. "Hazel" TV Show with New York World's Fair Storyline

    Was ours the only suburban family without a maid? What kind of job did Mr. B have to afford Hazel?
  8. Last week
  9. Expo 2017 report

    It was very similar, though with some tweaks that meant less scrummy at individual consoles - I wasn't that keen either
  10. "Hazel" TV Show with New York World's Fair Storyline

    There's a reason for that - Newton Minow, Kennedy's FCC head, effectively threatened the industry in 1961. The networks responded with bland inoffensive programming for the next few decades. https://mises.org/library/americas-first-television-czar
  11. "Hazel" TV Show with New York World's Fair Storyline

    Ford aired the Mustang in a special Hazel episode on April 16th, 1964, a day or so after it debuted at the fair in "Let's Get Away from It All" This thread's episode was aired on November 12, 1964. Interesting she said they had 10 months before they'd leave. (-: A side note, I thought the font used in Hazel's title screens were more for beach themed shows.
  12. Television was so innocent back then.
  13. "Hazel" TV Show with New York World's Fair Storyline

    The same thing goes for the pavilions that were selected ahead of time for depiction on souvenir plates, glasses, etc.
  14. "Hazel" TV Show with New York World's Fair Storyline

    I was thinking the same thing. For example, the Christopher Columbus ship doesn't seem as spectacular as she put it.
  15. "Hazel" TV Show with New York World's Fair Storyline

    Thanks for posting that! It's always interesting to see what attractions get mentioned in media at the time and compare to what is most remembered now.
  16. It's been a while since I posted to the community.

     

    Through the years since discovering and researching the Duro, Astro & Vacumet mechanical banks, I've made donations to seven prominent American Museums.

     

    Along with the Queens Museum, the others who've accepted my donations include the Smithsonian Air & Space, The Cosmosphere in Kansas, The USS Intrepid in New York City, The US Air Force Museum in Warner Robins and The Early Space Exploration Museum in Cape Canaveral.

     

    The most recent historical institution is the Henry Ford Museum in Detroit, where these historically significant banks were made.

     

    As most of you may already know, the Ford Motor Company was the New York World's Fair's biggest sponsor, so I thought I'd contact the museum and make an offer. After months of consideration, they finally accepted the donation, specimens of which may be found on the below links to their website...

     

     

    "Rocket Bank," circa 1951

    https://www.thehenryford.org/collections-and-research/digital-collections/artifact/463916 
    thf173780.jpg
    In the years before the space race of the late 1950s, many Americans viewed outer space exploration as fantasy and science fiction. Whimsical space toys based on popular movies, radio and television shows, and comics featured futuristic robots, ray guns, and spaceships. This mechanical rocket bank from about 1951 resembles those early comic-book-style space vehicles.
    www.thehenryford.org

    "Strato Bank," circa 1953

    https://www.thehenryford.org/collections-and-research/digital-collections/artifact/463919
    thf173779.jpg
    In the years before the space race of the late 1950s, many Americans viewed outer space exploration as fantasy and science fiction. Whimsical space toys based on popular movies, radio and television shows, and comics featured futuristic robots, ray guns, and spaceships. This mechanical "Strato" bank from about 1953 includes a mechanism for launching coins from the rocket through the ...
    www.thehenryford.org

    "Guided Missile" Mechanical Bank, circa 1957

    https://www.thehenryford.org/collections-and-research/digital-collections/artifact/463923 
    thf173781.jpg
    In the years before the space race of the late 1950s, many Americans viewed outer space exploration as fantasy and science fiction. Children's space toys -- including banks --reflected those futuristic visions. This "Guided Missile" bank, made by Astro Manufacturing about 1957, contains a spring-loaded mechanism that launches a coin into a slot in the underside of the rocket's nose.
    www.thehenryford.org
     
     

    "The Satellite Bank", circa 1961

    https://www.thehenryford.org/collections-and-research/digital-collections/artifact/464344
    thf173783.jpg
    Many early space toys depicted outer space as a futuristic fantasy world. But when space travel became possible, these toys became more realistic-looking. This bank, made about 1961, resembles rocket ships that launched people into orbit. It also commemorates the six U. S. astronauts chosen to be the first Americans in space.
    www.thehenryford.org
     

    "Plan-It" Mechanical Bank, circa 1959

    https://www.thehenryford.org/collections-and-research/digital-collections/artifact/464343 
    thf173786.jpg
    Many early space toys depicted outer space as a futuristic fantasy world. But when space travel became possible, these toys portrayed a more realistic and scientific vision. The "Plan-It" bank from about 1959 features the then nine planets -- possible destinations for future American astronauts as the U. S. entered the space race.
    www.thehenryford.org

    "Unisphere" Mechanical Bank, circa 1964

    https://www.thehenryford.org/collections-and-research/digital-collections/artifact/464345 

     

    Astro Manufacturing Cuff Links and Tie Clip Set, 1957-1963

     
     

    Astro Manufacturing Cuff Links and Tie Clip Set, 1957-1963

    https://www.thehenryford.org/collections-and-research/digital-collections/artifact/481438 
    thf174128.jpg
    This cuff links-and-tie clasp set was produced by Astro Manufacturing, the producer of the full-size mechanical version of the bank depicted on them. This so-called Astro Missile Coin Bank, like the other banks produced by this company, drew upon Americans’ interest in outer space during the mid-20th century. This set was a free gift when a bank placed its order.
    www.thehenryford.org

     

    They are also currently considering a vinyl Salesman's money pouch (picture attached.)

     

    It is a great honor that I had these opportunities to donate to these great American institutions.

    BERZAC CREDIT UNION BANM BAG MINT SMITHSONIAN PROSPECT 002.JPG

  17. "Hazel" TV Show with New York World's Fair Storyline

    Just Me, Harold and the Universe:
  18. Hi, Thanks everyone :D I am glad you liked it. I have just a few of these pre-fair large publicity shots and I really like this one as it can really provide a sense of scale once the height and dimensions are imaginable. Not a climb for the faint of heart! The only others I had or have seen (and sold) were from Herb Rolfes - perhaps 4 or 5 just of this subject, and so long ago from Herb himself. Best wishes, and Happy Holidays! Eric
  19. Hello Everyone: I haven't posted in a while, and thought I would share something I came across completely by accident yesterday. I turned the TV on and it was already on "Antenna TV" network, and an episode of "Hazel" was airing. It was about 12 minutes into the episode, and I happened to notice that she was talking to the character of Harold Baxter (the child of the family that she works for on the show). She was describing something to him, then I noticed she mentioned Magic Skyway and dinosaurs, and Santa Maria replica and then I realized that she was talking about the NYWF!!! I quickly googled the episode and discovered the title: "Just Me, Harold and the Universe", from Season 4 and was Episode 9 that originally aired November 12, 1964. As I started to pay attention from that point forward, I discovered that Hazel had entered a contest for Best Housekeeper of the Year, and the grand prize was a trip for two to the 1965 season of the New York World's Fair. The fair is mentioned a number of times from that point forward, and then after reading a little bit on the internet, I discovered that Ford Motor Company was the show's biggest sponsor, so it was only natural that there was a narrative by the Hazel character about the Magic Skyway and some of the attractions inside it. Just thought I would share that with everyone in case you would like to try to find the episode and watch it sometime. Ronald
  20. Great find--the newspaper article. I live between Binghamton and Syracuse. That was probably originally printed in The Binghamton Press. It merged with the Binghamton Sun Bulletin (a tabloid) in 1969. It still publishes, today, as the Press and Sun Bulletin.
  21. That's the plot of "The Englishman Who Went Up a Hill But Came Down a Mountain!"
  22. I'm not sure how the gypsum board survived in inclement weather. That must have been a chore throughout the year.
  23. That's a great photo, Eric. I remember the original goal was to coat the Trylon and Perisphere with concrete rather than the gypsum board eventually used. Had the first plan prevailed, maybe these structures would have survived.
  24. Great shot. I'm reminded of Spaceship Earth when I saw your photo.
  25. Thanks for posting Eric! Glad you have a new favorite. And good to hear from you! Seems like it’s been a long time. Nice photo. Looks like a sea urchin. Took a second for me to remember just how big that thing was compared to Unisphere!
  26. Hi All, I wanted to share a new 11x14 photo I added to my collection. Late 1938, Perisphere nearing completion from the highest point available. You can see the Observation Platform and also the edge of the Trylon on the far right. It can be seen at the NYPL site as NYPL catalog ID (B-number): b11686556 here - NYPL . I am unable to make a scan at this size so I am showing their copy for now. Mine is also double-weight, lacks the "FILE COPY" stamps all over the place, and is actually not as cropped as the NYPL example - so showing a good bit more image . The vantage - this was taken from inside the absolute tip top window looking down, with the GCP off to the far left. There is another photo of the same at the NYPL taken at the 470 foot window (you can see it at the linked page - see the other oversized images in this collection), but when you look out of that window, you can just barely see "over" to the center of the top surface of the Perisphere, where the rings meet - you need to be at this height - nearing 610' to see this in this fashion! And that is a bit too high for me! Oddly, the landscaping is ahead of the structures construction! This is now one of my favorite photographs. Best always and enjoy, Eric
  27. I still love the lake. I miss the good ol Midwest
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